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Concrobium Mold Control Review

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Almost everyone has heard Concrobium mentioned when it comes to mold remover products. It is one of the most widely used on the market.

Concrobium Mold Control claims to effectively eliminate existing mold, prevent mold re-growth and eliminate musty odors with no harmful chemicals.  This is marketed as a no-scrub product.

Various Concrobium Mold Control Products

How Does Concrobium Work?

You see, the active ingredients in Concrobium create a tri-salt polymer that is very alkaline. Mold does NOT like an environment with high alkalinity. When the formula is sprayed onto active mold growth,  the solution’s molecules dehydrate and pull in on each other, which crushes the existing mold spores and their colonies. Even when the solution has dried and remains in place over the mold-affected area for several months, it continues to leave a lasting alkaline barrier that prevents the possibility of mold regrowth. Once the mold is dried, it can no longer continue to grow.

Concrobium works on drywall, wood, composite wood, plastic, concrete, siding, shakes, metal, brick, stone, tile, grout, stucco, fabric, furniture, upholstery, flooring, and many more surfaces.

You can use it as a spray or in a fogger.

Active Ingredients

  • Water
  • Sodium Carbonate
  • Trisodium Phosphate
  • Alkali Metal Carbonate

Pros of Concrobium

  • Kills mold at the root
  • Prevents mold on surfaces
  • Easy to use
  • Affordable
  • Non toxic
  • Environmentally friendly
  • Various formulas to best suit your needs
  • It can safely be used in a mold fogger
  • Ready to use – no dilution required

Cons of Concrobium

  • Although it does prevent mold growth it only works on the surface and doesn’t address mold that might have made its way deeper inside building materials or furnishings.
  • In order for Concrobium to effectively prevent mold it must stay on the surface of whatever you applied it to. This means that if the surface does get cleaned or wet you need to reapply it.
  • Does not eliminate mycotoxins.

Toxic or Non-Toxic

Totally non-toxic. Trisodium Phosphate does carry some small risk of increasing asthma symptoms but the amount used in Concrobium is quite small and shouldn’t pose much of a risk.

Various Concrobium Mold Control Products

Final Verdict on Concrobium Mold Control

I like Concrobium. While it is still safer to physically remove mold, Concrobium encapsulates mold and then dries it out rendering it “dead.” I’ve used it in the past successfully and would use it again in the future. I think this is a great product to use in places like attics, basements, and crawlspaces as part of a mold prevention plan.

I prefer to remove the impacted material and THEN treat the area with Concrobium. The big pitfall for me is that mycotoxins are still in play with this product. If you have mold you have a strong chance of mycotoxins and I prefer to reduce them with the EC3 mold solution.

Click Here To Purchase Concrobium Mold Control In A Gallon Container

Click Here To Purchase Concrobium Mold Control In A Spray Bottle

To learn more about the other mold removers and commercial mold cleaning sprays I have reviewed, please visit my post on the Best Mold Remover Products.

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11 Comments

  1. Amanda M Shouse says:

    Hi have you used rmr 141? I am debating weather to use that or concodium in a fogger

    1. I’m not a fan of the RMR product line in general. Concrobium would be the better choice between the two.

    2. I fogger my 1600 sq ft home three times. Using three gallons. And my home still tested positive for mold. .

      1. Did you use Concrobium to fog with?

  2. Is this safe to use in a house with pet birds?

    1. Great question! It should be but let me find out for sure.

    2. Sorry for the delay! Finally have an answer. They suggested removing the birds from the area you are treating and allowing it to dry before the birds return. Obviously don’t spray the birds directly. But you can use it in rooms away from the birds without issue. It could be a mild eye irritant for the birds if any spray were to get into their eyes hence the suggestion to move them from the room being treated.

  3. For cleaning grout, tile, and painted bathroom walls and trim, would you recommend concrobium OR 20% vinegar/baking soda? And then follow up with EC3? I’m wondering what the concrobium replaces in the cleaning process. And if it’s not as effective as EC3, could we follow up on using concrobium with EC3?

    1. Hi Jen! Concrobium works differently and unfortunately won’t tackle any mycotoxins. I personally use vinegar and baking soda and then go back over everything with EC3. Vinegar and baking soda combined help to lift spores which allows you to actually remove as much as possible. Concrobium renders them inactive for a period of time but doesn’t assist in the removal process. Basically you get to use a little less elbow grease with the vinegar and baking soda. 😉

  4. What if you accidental poor on ur skin like ur arm and hands ? What should you do and how to wash it off?

  5. I have a few mold spots in a crawl space of a house at the shore. Remediation company proposals for just abatement range from $2,500 to $4,000. They don’t seems to propose more than just fogging. The floor in the crawl space is concrete, and there is no actual standing water or water intrusion. Does it make sense to install a commercial grade dehumidifier, let it run a couple weeks, and then fog with Concrobium?